Flushed Tidy-Tush Wipes Are Becoming Sewer Glob Monstrosities


Those pristine wet wipes that promise to tidy your tush seem innocent enough. They often come in blue or white packages and encourage you to treat yourself because, well, you deserve better than toilet paper. Best of all, you’re told, these wet wipes break down when you flush them.

But here’s the problem: While wet wipes may leave your behind sparkly clean, not all break down in sewer systems. Rather, they congeal and morph into gigantic, black, oily monstrosities that look more like they belong in a Stephen King film than anywhere near any city.

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‘Flushable’ wipes cause havoc in NYC’s plumbing and sewer systems


New York City’s sewer pipes are flush with problems thanks to flushable wipes.

The amount of debris — almost all of which is allegedly flushable wipes — removed from the screens in the city’s waste water treatment plants has more than doubled since 2008, according to the Department of Environmental Protection.

“Sanitary wipes do not break down like toilet paper and they clog the screens at the wastewater treatment facilities,” explained a DEP spokesman. How much does this cost our city? More than $18 million just in the last five years. Additional, unspecified costs are also incurred as a result of wipes jamming up pumps and gears that require repair, the spokesman added.

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Wet Wipes Box Says Flush. New York’s Sewer System Says Don’t


With its sewer system under siege, tallying millions of dollars in equipment damage across its underground maze, New York City is confronting a menace that has gummed the gears of plumbing networks around the world: the common wet wipe.

In recent years, the intersection of evolving hygienic sensibilities and aggressive industry marketing has fueled the product’s rise. Wet wipes, long used for baby care, have grown popular with adults.

Some of the products are branded as “flushable” — a characterization contested by wastewater officials and plaintiffs bringing class-action lawsuits against wipes manufacturers for upending their plumbing.

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‘Flushable’ Wipes Clogging up Sewer System in New York City


While “flushable” wipes are marketed as convenient, some lawmakers say they’re a huge inconvenience and want changes in how they’re sold.

“In the past we’d pull things out, normal stuff that you’d see in street, litter like a tin can, a plastic bottle,” said Vinny Sapienza, the Deputy Commissioner of DEP.

Now the Department of Environmental Protection would be happy to find that kind of garbage in their sewer system, instead they’re inundated with wipes for your behind.

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Company That Makes Wet Wipes Agrees Not To Call Products ‘Flushable’ Unless It Can Prove It


After pleas from sewage workers and hearing from plumbers who say flushable wipes are actually not flushable or good for sewer systems, one company that makes wet wipes for retail partners has agreed to stop marketing its products as safe for flushing, unless it can substantiate that claim.

The Federal Trade Commission announced a settlement with Nice-Pak Products, which makes wet wipes for reatil customers like Costco, CVS, Target and BJ’s Wholesale Club, wherein it agreed to stop advertising moist toilet tissues as flushable unless it can prove that they’re safe for sewer and septic tanks.

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Wet Wipes can’t claim they’re flushable anymore


Anyone who has ever dealt with a clogged drain—only to find the culprit is one of those “flushable” wipes from Costco, CVS, Target, or BJ’s—has cause for celebration.

The Federal Trade Commission just announced a settlement with moist toilet tissue producer Nice-Pak that prevents the company from continuing to claim its products are actually flushable, at least until it proves those claims through testing.

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Wet Wipe Manufacturer Agrees To Substantiate “Flushability” Advertising Claims under Settlement with FTC


Under a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission, Nice-Pak Products, Inc., a manufacturer of wet wipes, has agreed to stop advertising moist toilet tissue as flushable unless it can substantiate that the product is safe to flush. Similarly, Nice-Pak agreed to not claim that its moist toilet tissue is safe for sewer and septic tanks unless it has substantiation for those claims.

In addition, Nice-Pak will stop providing trade customers, such as retailers, with information to make such unsubstantiated claims. Costco, CVS, Target, and BJ’s Wholesale Club were Nice-Pak customers that sold the formulation of the company’s moist toilet tissue that was the subject of the complaint under their own private labels.

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Popular Bathroom Wipes Blamed For Sewer Clogs


Increasingly popular bathroom wipes – pre-moistened towelettes that are often advertised as flushable – are being blamed for creating clogs and backups in sewer systems around the nation.

Wastewater authorities say wipes may go down the toilet, but even many labeled flushable aren’t breaking down as they course through the sewer system. That’s costing some municipalities millions of dollars to dispatch crews to unclog pipes and pumps and to replace and upgrade machinery.

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‘Flushable’™ wipes blamed for sewer clogs


Increasingly popular bathroom wipes — pre-moistened towelettes that are often advertised as flushable — are being blamed for creating clogs and backups in sewer systems around the nation.

Wastewater authorities say wipes may go down the toilet, but even many labeled flushable aren’t breaking down as they course through the sewer system. That’s costing some municipalities millions of dollars to dispatch crews to unclog pipes and pumps and to replace and upgrade machinery.

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County: Don’t flush what says flushable


Flushable wipes may be convenient, but some plumbers say they have one big drawback: Many are not actually flushable.

The Frederick County Health Department encourages people to put all wipes, even those labeled “flushable,” in the trash.

“I will tell you from experience that these products do not biodegrade before they catch and clog in a private sewer system … (they) become almost like a pile of cement in your tank,” Roxanne Beal, of the county’s Well and Septic Division, wrote in an email.

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